PSA: Shy Introverts at Mass

One might think Mass is an ideal location for shy introverts. And, for the most part, it absolutely is. I mean, it’s an event where no one is expected to talk  except for the priest, deacon and a few others. Other events perfect for shy introverts include going to the movies, visiting libraries and hanging out at cemeteries.

But at Mass, there’s one part, albeit very short, that is the exact opposite of perfect for shy introverts. In fact, it ranks right up there with attending parties with people you barely know, running into an acquaintance at the grocery store and public speaking.

The Sign of Peace.

Yes. This beautiful part of the liturgy, where we extend peace to our brothers and sisters in Christ before partaking of the Eucharist, is actually quite the minefield for those of us that fall on the more awkward part of the social spectrum.

Below is a short PSA that shows what shy introverts go through at every Mass. EVERY MASS. Yes, you heard that right. This happens every single time. Sure, the shock wears off after the first few Masses. After that it’s just an expected socially awkward occasion where our hearts get the effect of cardio without the exercise. And there’s sweating without the exercise too. Try not to be jealous of the glamour.

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During my research, I came across this hilarious article about the Sign of Peace and the socially awkward by none other than Jennifer Fulwiler. Or as my husband and I refer to her in our household, JFul. It’s the hip hop name we’ve given her. 

Why We Said No to IVF–Before We Were Catholic

“Have you guys every considered IVF?”

Over the last ten years, we’ve been asked this question a number of times. And, since I have a heart for resolving others’ curiosity, I figured I could answer it in a public way.

The short answer: No.

The truth is, we never really got to a point to be able to consider IVF before discovering it was immoral.

Several years ago, I somehow came to be in possession of an issue of the magazine Christianity Today. I don’t know if we got it in the mail as a teaser or if someone gave it to me, but I opened it up and came across an article about IVF. It kind of blew my mind.

But let me take a few steps back.

Even before this article, I was always uncomfortable with the idea of IVF. I wanted to conceive a child with my husband, not with a lab technician. IVF seemed to be stepping outside the normal means to conceive a child as a desperate attempt to get something I wasn’t entitled to having. For me, having our own child by way of artificial reproductive technology (ART) just never outweighed conceiving a child within the unitive act of marriage.

Now–back to the magazine article.

The article laid out the basic process for IVF and I found it shocking. I no longer have the article, but what was detailed went something like this: The woman is given drugs so that several of her eggs mature at the same time. Eggs. Plural. The process is so expensive, that more than one egg has to be fertilized to increase the chances of conception. The eggs are taken from the woman and semen is collected from the man. The eggs and sperm are ultimately joined in a petri dish (in vitro is latin for “in glass”). Conception takes place and the embryos are allowed to develop for several days. And then begins the process of determining which fertilized embryos should be implanted into the woman’s uterus. The “strongest” embryos are transferred to the woman’s uterus while the others are destroyed or frozen. The woman is observed to see if the embryos implant. It may be that more than one do. In that case, she and the doctor may decide to to use “selective reduction”. At some point during the early part of the pregnancy, after the embryos become fetuses, the doctor will determine which are the less desirable ones. These are terminated by way of a needle filled with potassium chloride inserted into the fetal heart.

So. For someone that knew the science behind the start of human life, this article was, like I said, mind-blowing. At the time, I had no idea that IVF routinely involved the termination of fertilized eggs. Not that freezing human life seemed like a better idea.

“Why did you bring up being Catholic?”

Right. Why did I make a point to say we ruled out IVF before becoming Catholic? Too many times, people simply think it’s because we’re Catholic that we haven’t used IVF or any other ART. And when I say that, I mean people imply, unintentionally, that we somehow didn’t use our own brains when making this decision. Rather, it’s like they think we would jump at the idea of using IVF if only that curmudgeon of a Catholic Church would just let us.

And, hey, there might be people that feel that way. Which is perfectly reasonable. With something as complicated and deeply profound as the unitive act of marriage, coupled with the intense sorrow of infertility, it can take a lifetime to even start to come close to complete understanding.

But that’s not us. We get it. We’ve done our homework. We know the Church is teaching what is right. We’re sad we’ve been unable to conceive. We’re not sad about not using IVF.

So, that’s it. We will not be using IVF, or any other form of ART, to conceive a child. Children are a gift and we know that we’re not entitled to this gift. We also know that infertility isn’t something actively willed by God. His permissive will may allow it, and we fully trust that He will take our sorrow and work it for good.

…provided we also suffer with [Christ] in order that we may also be glorified with him

-Romans 8:17

For Friends & Family: We would like to state that this post is not intended as a judgment on anyone who has used IVF. All human life has value and should be cherished, regardless of the means by which it entered the world. We actually are not aware that anyone we know has used any form of ART. 

Sources & Helpful Links

A Catholic View of Reproductive Technology

In Vitro Fertilization

Good Intentions: Why IVF is Wrong

IVF, Custody Rights & Family Law
(the state deciding who’s a parent…because that will end well)

The Problem of Evil and Suffering

How can The Church Deny the Right of Women to use IVF?

The Hardest Teaching of Them All

Pope Francis: Encouraging Others, Challenging Me

The papal visit to the United States is wrapping up today, and any moment I’ve not been watching coverage, I’ve found myself deep in thought.

Pope Francis has given several speeches this week, including a few homilies, and then speaking to Congress and the United Nations, as well as the Bishops more than once, and then speeches at Independence Hall, the Festival of Families and the Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility.

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photo credit: reuters, dailymail.com

After hearing the Holy Father at all of these events, I’ve found myself encouraged but also challenged.

And isn’t that what a father is supposed to do?

Before the Pope’s arrival, I think many of us were looking forward to the Holy Father coming to our aid in a bold way. “Guess what guys? My dad’s here now and he’s gonna let you know what’s up.” Those of us that are faithful to the Church have found ourselves feeling ridiculed and bullied by our secular culture, led primarily by the media in all its forms. We stand with the Church and her teachings while the culture around us changes in the name of progressivism (progressing towards what I’m not sure). We’re often referred to as being stuck in the past or old-fashioned, or even worse.

Papa arrives, and I’m excited. The visual I have in my head is of myself standing, facing the opposition with my arms crossed, waiting for my Pope to let everybody have it. Instead, Pope Francis opens his arms to everyone and welcomes them.

Fine. I tell myself the Pope will let ’em have it tomorrow at Congress.

But again I find myself a little hurt, and let’s be honest, jealous. “Papa, why are you being so gentle and welcoming? These people turned away from you. They’ve ridiculed God’s Church, and even more, they ridicule me. Tell them they’re wrong!”

Yet again, I find myself in the story of the prodigal son. And, yet again, I’m playing the role of the older son, letting feelings of pride and self-importance run rampant.

 

rembrant-prodigal-son-detail

But while he was yet at a distance, his father saw him and had compassion, and ran and embraced him and kissed him.

Luke 15:20

 

 

 

 

The Challenge

After watching and listening to Pope Francis these few days, I’ve come away with a broader understanding of his mission. When he said “environment” and “climate change” I heard it through the filter of our American politics…how very American of me. But now I hear the Holy Father talking to the masses, calling them to step away from the culture of waste.

The culture of waste starts small. First you’re just tossing out silverware for a shiny new set, then later you find yourself not even grateful for the silverware, old or new. And then this throwaway mentality spreads. People think they have a right to toss out anything unwanted, even the elderly, the terminally ill or the unborn.

Pope Francis is reaching out to the masses, finding common ground, encouraging their desire to take care of our God-given natural resources so that future generations will not only take special care of the environment, but also welcome and care for other living things, like human beings.

And shouldn’t we take care of what God has given us? No parent would allow their child to keep their room in utter disarray, using clothing to mop up spills, all the while saying to their parents, “What’s the big deal? I’m going to grow out of these clothes in a month and you’ll get me new ones.” Rather, parents here on Earth and our Father in Heaven call on their children to show their trust with little things so that they can be trusted with greater things. If we can’t show honor and respect to something like a river given to us by God to provide us with water, how can we show honor and respect for human beings that seem to provide us with nothing except burden?

My challenge specifically? To step away from my pride and petty us vs them constructs. To make love grow.

This means standing for what’s right while simultaneously making people feel welcome. The beautiful Both/And concept the Church teaches.

But what does this look like in practice? Pope Francis warned against getting caught in incessant cycles of explaining of church teachings. I think I could do a little less sharing of articles, blog posts and the like, and do a little more of reaching out to those around me. Calling at least one person on the phone each week. Taking the time to actually comment on social media posts instead of just scrolling by or “liking” it. Finding common ground with those in my life who are opposed to me on various issues. Finding new ways to love my husband in ways he receives love best.

I once heard Fr. Longenecker speak at our parish, and he said something that stayed with me and I think it applies here. He advised to approach all things in life with saying Yes.  At first, this made no sense to me. But then I realized it was the difference between approaching things with a hard heart and a loving heart. The Pharisees led with No. Leading with Yes means truly hearing what is being presented to you, and then making thoughtful decisions instead of being reactionary.

There’s a lot more to be said; I could go on to further explain in detail what I really meant here or when I said this I didn’t mean that. But I think I’ll just let it lay, and end with today’s readings, which I thought were a ideal end to Pope Francis’ visit to the United States.

Today’s Readings

Numbers 11:25-29

The LORD came down in the cloud and spoke to Moses.
Taking some of the spirit that was on Moses,
the LORD bestowed it on the seventy elders;
and as the spirit came to rest on them, they prophesied.

Now two men, one named Eldad and the other Medad,
were not in the gathering but had been left in the camp.
They too had been on the list, but had not gone out to the tent;
yet the spirit came to rest on them also,
and they prophesied in the camp.
So, when a young man quickly told Moses,
“Eldad and Medad are prophesying in the camp, ”
Joshua, son of Nun, who from his youth had been Moses’aide, said,
“Moses, my lord, stop them.”
But Moses answered him,
“Are you jealous for my sake?
Would that all the people of the LORD were prophets!
Would that the LORD might bestow his spirit on them all!”

James 5:1-6

Come now, you rich, weep and wail over your impending miseries.
Your wealth has rotted away, your clothes have become moth-eaten,
your gold and silver have corroded,
and that corrosion will be a testimony against you;
it will devour your flesh like a fire.
You have stored up treasure for the last days.
Behold, the wages you withheld from the workers
who harvested your fields are crying aloud;
and the cries of the harvesters
have reached the ears of the Lord of hosts.
You have lived on earth in luxury and pleasure;
you have fattened your hearts for the day of slaughter.
You have condemned;
you have murdered the righteous one;
he offers you no resistance.

Mark 9:38-43, 45, 47-48

At that time, John said to Jesus,
“Teacher, we saw someone driving out demons in your name,
and we tried to prevent him because he does not follow us.”
Jesus replied, “Do not prevent him.
There is no one who performs a mighty deed in my name
who can at the same time speak ill of me.
For whoever is not against us is for us.
Anyone who gives you a cup of water to drink
because you belong to Christ,
amen, I say to you, will surely not lose his reward.

“Whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in me to sin,
it would be better for him if a great millstone
were put around his neck
and he were thrown into the sea.
If your hand causes you to sin, cut it off.
It is better for you to enter into life maimed
than with two hands to go into Gehenna,
into the unquenchable fire.
And if your foot causes you to sin, cut if off.
It is better for you to enter into life crippled
than with two feet to be thrown into Gehenna.
And if your eye causes you to sin, pluck it out.
Better for you to enter into the kingdom of God with one eye
than with two eyes to be thrown into Gehenna,
where ‘their worm does not die, and the fire is not quenched.'”

 

National Infertility Awareness Week 2015: A Catholic Perspective

blog graphic One in six couples will experience infertility at some point in their marriage. Infertility is medically defined as the inability to conceive after 12 cycles of “unprotected” intercourse or 6 cycles using “fertility-focused” intercourse. A couple who has never conceived has “primary infertility” and a couple who has conceived in the past (regardless of the outcome) but is unable to again has “secondary infertility”. Many couples who experience infertility have also experienced miscarriage or pregnancy loss.

 This week, April 19 – 25, 2015 is National Infertility Awareness Week.

We, a group of Catholic women who have experienced infertility, would like to take a moment to share with you what the experience of infertility is like, share ways that you can be of support to a family member or friend, and share resources that are helpful.

If you are experiencing infertility, please know you are not alone. You are loved and prayed for and there are resources to help you with the spiritual, emotional, and medical aspects of this journey

The Experience of Infertility

In the beginning of trying to conceive a child, there is much hope and anticipation; for some, even a small fear of “what if we get pregnant right away?” There is planning of how to tell your husband and when you’d announce to the rest of the family. It is a joyful time that for most couples results in a positive pregnancy test within the first few months. However, for one in six couples, the months go by without a positive test and the fears and doubts begin to creep in. At the 6th month of trying using fertility-focused intercourse (using Natural Family Planning), the couple knows something is wrong and is considered “infertile” by doctors who understand the charting of a woman’s pattern of fertility. At the 9th month of trying, the month that, had they conceived that first month, a baby would have been arriving, is often the most painful of the early milestones. At the 12th month mark the couple “earns” the label from the mainstream medical community as “infertile”.

As the months go by, the hopes and dreams are replaced with fears, doubts, and the most invasive doctors’ appointments possible. As a Catholic couple faithful to the teachings of the Church, we are presented by secular doctors with options that are not options for us and are told things like “you’ll never have children” and “you have unexplained infertility”; by our Catholic doctors we are told to keep praying and to have hope as they roll up their sleeves and work hard to figure out the cause of our infertility, with each visit asking, “How are you and your husband doing with all of this?”

We find it hard to fit in. We have faith and values that are different than our secular culture, but our small families, whether childless (primary infertility) or with fewer children than we hoped for (secondary infertility), make us blend in with the norm. We have faith and values that are in line with the teachings of our Church, but our daily life looks so much different than the others who share those values and that makes us stand out in a way that we would rather not. We are Catholic husbands and wives living out our vocation fully. Our openness to life does not come in the form of children; it takes on the form of a quiet “no” or “not yet” or “maybe never” from God each month as we slowly trod along. Our openness to and respect for life courageously resists the temptations presented to us by the secular artificial reproductive technology industry.

Often times our friends and family do not know what to say to us, and so they choose to not say anything. Our infertility stands like a great big elephant in the room that separates us from others. Most of the time, we don’t want to talk about it, especially not in public or in group settings because it is painful and we will often shed tears. We realize it is difficult and ask that you realize this difficulty as well. We will do our best to be patient and to explain our situation to those who genuinely would like to know, but please respect our privacy and the boundaries we establish, as not only is infertility painful, it is also very personal.

One of the hardest experiences of infertility is that it is cyclical. Each month we get our hopes up as we try; we know what our due date would be as soon as we ovulate; we know how we would share the news with our husband and when and how we would tell our parents. We spend two weeks walking a fine line between hope and realism, between dreaming and despairing. When our next cycle begins – with cramps and bleeding and tears – we often only have a day or two before we must begin taking the medications that are meant to help us conceive. There is little to no time to mourn the dream that is once again not achievable; no time to truly allow ourselves to heal from one disappointment before we must begin hoping and trying again. We do not get to pick what days our hormones will plummet or how the medications we are often taking will affect us. We do not get to pick the day that would be “best” for us for our next cycle to start. We are at the mercy of hope, and while that hope keeps us going it is also what leaves us in tears when it is not realized.

Some will experience infertility with a complete lack of cycles. Some couples won’t even get to experience the benefit of being able to really try to conceive because of this harsh reality, which is a constant reminder of brokenness for those experiencing it. The pain and anxiety that comes from a lack of reproductive health can be crippling.

And yet others, despite hormonal dysfunction and health issues, will experience the cyclical nature of infertility through conception itself (or recurring conception). These couples go on to lose their children (early, full term, or shortly after birth, and anywhere in between) either once or many times. If you know that we’ve experienced a loss (something we may or may not have the courage to share), know that we are grieving. It wasn’t “just” a pregnancy or “just another” pregnancy that was lost; it was our living baby that died. And we are more likely to be traumatized by the cyclical nature of our infertility because of our losses. We do not get to choose that our cycles will mimic our losses. We are at the mercy of hope.

Our faith is tested. We ask God “why?”, we yell at Him; we draw closer to God and we push Him away. Mass brings us to tears more often than not and the season of Advent brings us to our knees. The chorus of “Happy Mother’s Day” that surrounds us at Mass every year will be almost more devastating than the blessing of mothers itself. We know that the Lord is trustworthy and that we can trust in Him; sometimes it is just a bigger task than we can achieve on our own.

Please…

* Pray for us. Truly, it is the best thing that anyone can do.

* Do not make assumptions about anything – not the size of a family or whether or not a couple knows what is morally acceptable to the Church. Most couples who experience infertility do so in silence and these assumptions only add to the pain. If you are genuinely interested, and not merely curious, begin a genuine friendship and discover the truth over time.

* Do not offer advice such as “just relax,” “you should adopt,” “try this medical option or that medical option” – or really give any advice. Infertility is a symptom of an underlying medical problem; a medical problem that often involves complicated and invasive treatment to cure.

* Do not assume that we will adopt. Adoption is a separate calling and should be discerned by every married couple irrespective of their ability to conceive biological children. Infertility does not automatically mean that a couple is meant to adopt.

* Do not assume that if we try to adopt that the process will be successful. Many adoption attempts fail and don’t result in a couple receiving a child placement (temporarily or permanently). Some couples are flat out rejected from attempting to adopt by different agencies and governments. Just like adoption is an incredibly intrusive and emotionally charged issue that is part of a separate calling in the journey to “parenthood”, it isn’t always a possibility for infertile parents. Do not assume we can. And be gentle if we are trying. It’s extra painful to be infertile and not be able to adopt. And we are likely so hurt that we can’t bear to share the details with everyone.

* Ask how we are doing and be willing to hear and be present for the “real” answer. Often times we answer, “OK” because that’s the easy, “safe” answer. Let us know that you are willing to walk through this tough time with us. Frequently we just need someone who is willing to listen and give us a hug and let us know we are loved.

* Offer a Mass for us or give us a prayer card or medal to let us know you are praying for us. Just please refrain from telling us how we must pray this novena or ask for that saint’s intercession. Most likely we’ve prayed it and ask for the intercession daily. Please feel free to pray novenas and ask for intercessions on our behalf.

* Be tolerant and patient. The medications we take can leave us at less than our best; we may not have the energy or ability to do much. Please also respect us when we say “no, thank you” to food or drinks. We may have restricted diets due to our medical conditions and/or medications.

* Share the good news of your pregnancy privately (preferably in an email or card or letter and not via text, IM chat, phone call or in person) and as soon as possible. Please understand that we are truly filled with joy for you; any sadness we feel is because we have been reminded of our own pain and we often feel horrible guilt over it as well. Please be patient and kind if we don’t respond immediately, attend your baby shower or don’t “Like” all of your Facebook updates about your children. Again, it is really about us, not you.

* Help steer group conversations away from pregnancy and parenting topics when we are around. We like to be able to interact in a conversation to which we can contribute meaningfully.

*Do not exclude us from your life because you think we may be uncomfortable. It is actually more painful to be left out because of the cross we’re carrying, and we know that doesn’t make a lot of sense to our families and friends. We will excuse ourselves from events or situations if we must, and please let us do so gracefully if the circumstance arises.

* Do not ask when we are going to “start a family” (we started one the day we got married).

* Do not ask which one of us is the “problem” – we are either fertile or infertile as a couple.

* Do grieve with us if you know that we’ve experienced a miscarriage, stillbirth, or infant death (or many). You may not know what to say to comfort us, and that’s ok. Let us grieve at our own pace and on our own schedule without guilt or explanations, even if we have living children. Do not offer platitudes for why you think it happened, how you think it’s part of God’s plan for us to suffer, or any number of things you think might have been wrong with the child. It was our living baby that died. Let us grieve, pray for us, and if you can, let us know you care by being there for us in our grief. Let us know that you remember that our baby lived, no matter how short of a life.

* Do not say things like “I know you’ll be parents some day,” or “It will happen, I know it will!” Along the same lines, please do not tell us stories of a couple you know who struggled for years and went on to conceive or to “just adopt and then you’ll get pregnant” (this one actually only happens a small percentage of the time). Only God knows what our future holds, please pray with us that we are able to graciously accept His will for our lives.

* Do not pity us. Yes, we have much sorrow. Yes, we struggle. But, we place our faith in God, lean on the grace of our marriage, and trust that someday, whether here on earth or in heaven, we will see and understand God’s plan.


Because this topic is so difficult for so many women and men, the best thing our friends and family can do (and indeed strangers we encounter who may be aware of our struggles) is pray for us. We are grateful for those who offer their prayers and support in a gentle way. Your support is invaluable to us.

Lastly, remember that compassion means “to suffer with”. We didn’t sign up for this to happen. We can’t control whether we overcome this. And we’re doing our best to navigate the murky waters and maintain our sanity and our faith and our relationships with our family and friends through it all. We truly need your support and love to accomplish that. Please, please suffer with us and be Christ to us. No other understanding of our cross will be more merciful or more loving than if you put yourself in a situation to sympathize or empathize with us. The pain of infertility is exacerbated by the fact that it draws us into ourselves. We need your help to remind us in the most difficult moments that we aren’t alone, God didn’t forget us, and that we have something precious to offer through the fruitfulness of our marriage even when it isn’t manifesting in the children we so desperately want to hold. Together, we can offer up our shared suffering for Christ. It’s a powerful witness to both of our faiths to travel this road together and we’ll manage it better with your help than if we have to travel it all alone.



This post was made possible through the collaboration of 430 members of a “secret” facebook group of women and men struggling with the pains of infertility in all of its forms that accepts the Catholic teaching on moral law. Together we are stronger. And in having the conversation, we are breaking the silence.

If you are experiencing the pains of infertility and would like to join a “secret” facebook support group, please let me know and I will happily add you to our discussion.

Hey Job–You Stole My Line!

Actually, I’m stealing Job’s.  The first reading for Mass on Sunday, February 8th was Job 7:1-4, 6-7:

Has not man a hard service upon earth, and are not his days like the days of a hireling? Like a slave who longs for the shadow, and like a hireling who looks for his wages, so I am allotted months of emptiness, and nights of misery are apportioned to me. When I lie down I say, ‘When shall I arise?’ But the night is long, and I am full of tossing till the dawn.

My days are swifter than a weaver’s shuttle, and come to their end without hope. ‘Remember that my life is a breath; my eye will never again see good.

We arrived at Mass a little early.  My husband went to light a candle for someone, while I sat in the pew.  I organized the pew rack, then I kneeled to pray, and then I read the readings for the day.  When I finished this passage from Job, I looked up to the tabernacle and said, “Job’s words are my words.”

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The Life of St. Nicholas

I spent most of my life not knowing how big my family really is.

When I became Catholic, it was like this curtain was opened and I was introduced to so many people!

“Hey!  Where did you guys come from?!”

Sure, I can’t see them physically.  My limitations are quite severe while I’m here on earth.  But it doesn’t mean that these people aren’t part of my family, and that when they died they quit participating as members of the body of Christ.

We are all part of the body of Christ, and He has only one body.  Christ doesn’t have one body on earth, and another in heaven.

Well, one of my favorite people I’ve gotten to know over the past few years is St. Nicholas.  He’s remembered every year during the Christmas season, although sometimes he’s referred to as Santa Claus.

There are so many great stories about the life of St. Nicholas.  Last year, I wanted to create something for my kindergarten CCE class so they could learn about St. Nicholas.  First, I went to the internet to see what was out there.  Once again, I couldn’t find exactly what I was looking for, so I gathered online resources and took to powerpoint.

Thanks to The St. Nicholas Center for all the free resources!  Please check out their site for what seems like an endless amount of activities about St. Nicholas.

I’ll be showing this to my kindergarteners the week before Christmas, and wanted to share it in case someone else was looking for something.  Again–please disregard my imperfect narration!

My favorite story about St. Nicholas I didn’t include in my presentation, due to the graphic nature of the story, so I’ll present it here.

Sometimes it’s a butcher, other times an innkeeper, but either way a small business owner was very wicked, and these stories led to St. Nicholas being the patron saint and protector of children.

The story goes that an innkeeper robbed and murdered three students traveling to Athens, and hid their remains in a large pickling tub.  St. Nicholas was traveling and happened to stay at the same inn.  During the night, he dreamed of the crime, got up and found the innkeeper.  He went to the pickling tub and prayed earnestly to God.  The students were restored to life.

In France, a butcher captures three small children, who had wandered while playing and gotten lost.  The Butcher chops them up and stores them in a large container, perhaps to pass them off as food for the townspeople.  St. Nicholas comes across the butcher shop, and is made aware of the crime.  He appeals to God and the children are restored to life.

I hope my video helps you get to know St. Nicholas!

If you’re interested in learning about the communion of saints and why Catholics talk to their brothers and sisters in heaven, check out Patrick Madrid’s article Any Friend of God is a Friend of Mine.  

All About Advent

Interested in a simple, straight-forward explanation about Advent that even a kindergartener could understand?

Well, you came to the right place.  I teach a kindergarten CCE class at St. Theresa’s in Sugar Land, Texas and this year I was looking for a simple image or video to help me explain Advent and what the parts of the wreath mean.  Nothing I found was exactly what I was looking for, so I opened up Powerpoint and made my own.

To be fair, what I made isn’t exactly what I’m looking for either, but until I become more tech savvy, this is the best I got.  And, please, disregard my very non-radio voice.

Happy Advent!

And for a virtual advent wreath, see the slideshow below.

Check out these links for more resources for Advent:

Family Conversations about Advent

Advent Wreath Prayers

Advent Prayers

Daily Scripture Readings for Advent
powerpoint file:  The Advent Wreath

powerpoint file:  Our Advent Wreath